Sportfishing in Costa Rica
Jun21

Sportfishing in Costa Rica

Sportfishing in Costa Rica Costa Rica is a tropical country located close by the equator. The water around it is subjected to various micro climates and is enriched with nutrient attracting a plethora of plankton blooms. These tiny plankton initiate a perfect food chain and this is the reason why there are so many marine creatures in the Costa Rican water. Surrounded by Pacific Ocean on one end and by the Caribbean Sea on the other, the country provides superb opportunities for sport fishing. Whether it is an angler, a world class fisherman, or a novice traveler, sportfishing for game fish species is a real deal here. The fishes have different interests and habits. Some of them dwell in the deeper areas while some live in the shallow coastal water. In addition to this, several of the species have a seasonal pattern. Depending upon the time of year, you can determine what kind of fish you are likely to catch. On your tropical respite in Costa Rica, don’t miss such a wonderful opportunity and fish to your heart’s content! Following are the most common game fish species found in Costa Rica: Yellowfin Tuna The yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) is a type of marine tuna fish found in tropical and subtropical areas all over the world. Often called as ‘the ball of muscle’, yellowfin tuna is a strong fish which put up an amazing fight once it is hooked. The acrobatic jumps, runs and its constant striving can even make any professional fishermen give up! With its super fighting abilities and patience, yellowfin tuna provides a great challenge to anglers and fishermen. Once caught, it also makes quite a delicious meal! Wahoo Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri) is a dark blue scombrid fish present in tropical and subtropical marine waters all over the world. It is one of the most sought after game fishes due its incredible speed, aggressive fights, and excellent meat quality. Catching wahoo is quite a challenge to sport fishermen. In Costa Rica, wahoo is served a delicacy in expensive restaurants. Hard to catch and rare to come across, landing upon a wahoo turns out to be a pleasant surprise. Tarpon Tarpons are considered to be a fabulous sport fishing catch. They are admired among sport fishermen as they present a great challenge due to their impressive size, amazing acrobatic moves and long fights that can exhaust even professionals. In Costa Rica, numerous sportfishing tournaments are held to catch tarpons. Swordfish Swordfish is a highly prized game fish that belongs to the family Xiphiidae. They are often categorized with the billfish. The elusory sport fish is quite hard to...

Read More
Swordfish in Costa Rica
Jun20

Swordfish in Costa Rica

Swordfish in Costa Rica Swordfish, or broadbill, is a huge, predacious fish recognized by its long, flat bill. Swordfish is a highly prized game fish that belongs to the family Xiphiidae. They are often categorized with the billfish. The elusory sport fish is quite hard to find and catch and it is a pleasant surprise to land on them. Swordfish are found in tropical and temperate areas of Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans from the surface to the depth of 550 meters. Costa Rica is a tropical country that has gained tremendous popularity in the last few years. Along with incredible aquatic sport opportunities, it offers numerous fishing grounds to tourists and anglers. To the delight of sportfishing enthusiasts, various towns hold fishing tournaments now and then. There are plenty of swordfish residing in the warm, sultry water of Costa Rica and on your lucky day, you may catch a few of those! Description The name swordfish is derived from the fish’s elusive bill that resembles a sword. The bill not only helps them in swimming but also is very handy in capturing the prey. The swordfish can typically reach over the length of 3 meters and can weigh about 650 kg. Their life span is at least 9 years and they reach maturity around the age of 4 to 5 years. Female swordfishes are larger than the male ones. Swordfish are ectothermic species and they have the ability to conserve heat like marlins, sharks and some tuna. Dietary Habits and Predation Swordfish are elusive predators. They are nocturnal hunters and feed everyday. During the night time, they swim up to the surface waters and prey on small fish. Adults mostly feed on pelagic fish like mackerel, barracudas, silver hake, rockfish, herring, lantern fish, demersal fish, scombrids, butterfish, bluefish, and sand lance as well as on squids and crustaceans. They slash and injure the larger fish with their sword like bill while they swallow the smaller fish as a whole. In turn, swordfish is attacked by killer whales, sharks, and other marine mammals. Swordfish are often infected with parasites like tapeworms, roundworms, copepods, remora or lampreys. They try to get rid of them by breaching and basking at the surface. Habitat Swordfish like to live in the water temperature ranging from 18 to 22 centigrade. They prefer to live alone or in small groups rather than living in large packs. Swordfish – Where and When to Find in Costa Rica Popular swordfish sportfishing spots in Costa Rica are Drake Bay and Golfito in the southern side, Quepos and Manuel Antonio in the Central Pacific Region, Guanamar, Flamingo in the...

Read More
Tarpon in Costa Rica
Jun19

Tarpon in Costa Rica

Tarpon in Costa Rica Tarpons are large fish species that belongs to the genus Megalops and the family Megalopidae. Tarpons are found in warm, shallow tropical waters of Indo-Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean. Tarpons are considered to be a fabulous sport fishing catch. They are admired among sport fishermen as they present a great challenge due to their impressive size, amazing acrobatic moves and long fights that can exhaust even professionals. As they are inedible, they are usually released after they are hooked. In Costa Rica, numerous sportfishing tournaments are held to catch tarpons. The fish is said to be around since prehistoric times and Costa Rica is one of the few countries to have them. On your fishing expedition in Costa Rican marine water, you may get lucky and land upon a tarpon. Description Tarpons have blue or green dorsal and anal fins with characteristic lateral stripes and lustrous sliver scales over the entire body except the head. Their eyes are large with adipose eyelids, broad mandible (lower jaw) that extends outward. Tarpons can reach over the length of 5 to 8 feet and weigh up to 80 to 280 pounds. They are late growers and it takes them 7 to 13 years to mature. During the breeding season, a female tarpon can lay more than 12 millions of eggs! Tarpons have a distinctive feature called a swim bladder. The purpose of a swim bladder is like a respiratory organ which allows tarpons to breathe above the surface. However, this ‘air breathing’ is essential for tarpons because if they don’t, they die. This is why tarpons are often sighted leaping above the water surface. Dietary Habits and Predation Juvenile tarpons don’t eat; instead they absorb nutrients from the marine water. As they grow, they begin to feed on zooplanktons, insects, small fish and eventually crabs, grass shrimps and larger species. Mature tarpons are purely carnivorous and hunt during the night time. Depending upon their size, tarpons can be captured by zooplanktons, sea birds, crocodiles, sharks and porpoises. Habitat Tarpons are found in Indo-Pacific region and Atlantic coast of Virginia, Brazil to the Gulf of Mexico and to the Caribbean region. They flourish in both salt and fresh water and thus it is common to find a tarpon in rivers, brackish water, marshes, tidal pools and creeks. Juveniles prefer shallow, muddy waters while adults like to reside in the ocean. It is seen both inshore and offshore waters. Tarpons – Where and When to Find in Costa Rica Tarpons are seen everywhere along the Caribbean and Pacific coasts of Costa Rica in marine as well as fresh water like...

Read More
Wahoo in Costa Rica – A Faboulous Catch!
Jun19

Wahoo in Costa Rica – A Faboulous Catch!

Wahoo Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri) is a dark blue scombrid fishpresent in tropical and subtropical marine waters all over the world. It is one of the most sought after game fishes due its incredible speed, aggressive fights, and excellent meat quality. Catching wahoo is quite a challenge to sport fishermen and anglers which makes the fish a very popular trophy species. In Costa Rica, wahoo is served a delicacy in expensive restaurants. Whether you are a seasoned angler or a novice traveler on a fishing cruise, do try your luck in the Costa Rican waters and you won’t be disappointed. Hard to catch and rare to come across, landing upon a wahoo turns out to be a pleasant surprise. Description Wahoo has an oblong body entirely covered with tiny scales which are hardly visible. Its body features a lustrous blue back, silver sides and blue vertical bars with a set of sharp teeth. The rainbow like color fades away quickly when the death is near. Wahoo has a large mouth with a somewhat sharper set of jaws as compared to king and Spanish mackerels. Another distinguishing feature is the mandible. The mandible of king mackerel is covered by a fold of skin when the mouth is closed unlike in wahoo. Wahoo is also very similar to barracuda. However, unlike wahoo, barracuda has larger and prominent scales. In length, wahoo up to 8 feet 2 inches tall have been seen! They can weight about 83 kilograms! Wahoo is the few of the fastest swimmers in the oceanic world. They swim at the speed of 60 mph! Dietary Habits Wahoo likes to feed on small fishes like sardines, scads, mackerel, squids and crustaceans. Blessed with razor sharp teeth, they often bite large bits out of bigger species. They are sub hunters which means they wait below the surface zone and then ambush their prey with speed and power. They actively hunt during mornings and evenings. Habitat Wahoo are usually found nearby the reefs, pinnacles, wrecks and rock formations. You may also find them offshore roaming in the deep azure water. They are loners and like to live alone or in small packs of two to three wahoos. Wahoo – Where and When to Find in Costa Rica Wahoos are present ocean wide. Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean have tropical and subtropical areas where thousands of wahoos dwell. In Costa Rica, a plethora of wahoos are found on the Pacific coast especially in summers. Although they are present in the coastal waters throughout the year, January to April and the green season from May to September are considered as the peak...

Read More
Yellowfin Tuna
Jun19

Yellowfin Tuna

Yellowfin Tuna The yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) is a type of marine tuna fish found in tropical and subtropical areas all over the world. Costa Rica is a tropical country famous for its pristine beaches, verdurous jungles and superb tourist destinations. One of the many things that make Costa Rica popular is its aquatic sports opportunities. Visitors have a chance to try out surfing to brave the challenging waves, scuba diving and snorkeling, sailing, kayaking and sportfishing. Costa Rica is a worldwide famous spot for sportfishing. There are hundreds of different species of game fish waiting to be caught. One of the trophy game fishes is a yellowfin tuna. Often called as ‘the ball of muscle’, yellowfin tuna is a strong fish which put up an amazing fight once it is hooked. The acrobatic jumps, runs and its constant striving can even make any professional fishermen give up! With its super fighting abilities and patience, yellowfin tuna provides a great challenge to anglers and fishermen. Once caught, it also makes quite a delicious meal! On your Costa Rican retreat, venture out to the sea and fish for yellowfin tuna! Description Yellowfin tuna is considered to be a large fish among some other tuna species. It is typically a ‘football’ sized fish but it can weigh up to 400 pounds. Lengths up to 239 centimeters have been reported, but commonly they are 6 feet tall. The juvenile tuna grows rapidly in the first year. Their life span can range from 4 to 10 years. The fish is named after its brightly yellow colored dorsal fin, anal fin, tail and finlets. The main body has a metallic blue and silver color with vertical stripes. The pectoral fins of yellowfin tuna do not reach past the anal fin unlike big eye tuna, in which they do. The pectoral fins are a good way to tell the two species apart as they are so similar looking! Dietary Habits and Predation Yellowfin Tuna feed upon other pelagic fish such as lantern-fish, myctophids, driftfish, anchovies, sardines, and crustacean, squids, >flying fishes, and young fishes. Tuna species is known for its awesome speed. Just like all other tunas, yellowfin tuna can easily capture their victim with a rapid speed. Larger yellowfin often prey on smaller tuna members like skip-jack, frigate mackerel and so on. Yellowfin tuna themselves fall victim to larger tuna, seabirds, wahoo, sharks, billfish and marlins. As yellowfin are fantastic swimmers, they are able to escape death most of the time. Habitat Yellowfin tuna are epipelagic species which means they dwell in the sunlit or euphotic zone, the top layer of the ocean zones....

Read More
Snook in Costa Rica
Jun18

Snook in Costa Rica

Snook in Costa Rica The snook (Centropomus undecimalis) is a salt water fish that belongs to the family Centropomidae of the order Perciformes. In Costa Rica, snook is commonly found in the shallow coastal waters of Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea as well as in lagoons, estuaries and river mouths. Snook is a trophy sporting fish well known for its impressive fights and large size. It is also recognized as a delicious meal! Description It has a dull gray colored body with black lateral lines, a large lower jaw, yellow colored fins and pelvic. . A snook normally grows up to the length of 4.6 feet and can weigh about 24 kilograms. Dietary Habits of a Snook Snook is a carnivorous species. It feeds upon small reef fishes and crustaceans like shrimps and crabs. Snook – Where and When to Find in Costa Rica Snook dwells in inshore, shallow water up to the depth of 66 feet. They are also seen in fresh water. Osa Peninsula, Savegre River, Quepos, Manuel Antonio and Cano Negro Reserve are few of the places where snooks are found in abundance. The peak season to catch them is from August to January when it is raining cats and dogs!  Snook in Costa Rica References http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_snook http://www.costa-rica-fishing.info/fish-identification/snook.html...

Read More